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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Right to Vote

When a Constitutional Amendment specifically identifies a right, it cannot be considered as something less - it cannot be considered as a privilege. For instance: it's the right to free speech, not the privilege. It's the right to bear arms, not the privilege.

The Fifteenth Amendment states that:

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

The Nineteenth Amendment states that:

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

The Twenty-Fourth Amendment states that:

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

The Twenty-Sixth Amendment states that:

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Voting is a right, not a privilege, specifically named by multiple Constitutional amendments, and must be defended as strongly as every other right so named.

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